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Massey appointed as Superior Court judge

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Massey appointed as Superior Court judge

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Terry Massey

OCMULGEE CIRCUIT

Greensboro resident Terry Massey has been appointed as a Superior Court judge for Ocmulgee Judicial Circuit, Gov. Nathan Deal announced last week.

He will fill the vacancy created by Judge Trenton Brown’s appointment to the Georgia Court of Appeals.

Massey said he feels his diverse legal background has uniquely prepared him to move into his new position.

“I’ve had a very diverse practice, from criminal and domestic, which is the large majority of what Superior Court judges handle, as well as a broad range of corporate cases,” Massey said. “So that’s probably what I would say is my best asset for the bench.”

Massey graduated from the University of Georgia School of Law in 1990. He practices at Massey Law Firm, LLC in Conyers, where he has also served as a municipal court judge since 1995.

To be considered by the governor for the position, Massey had to fill out a 15-page application, prepare references and interview with the Judicial Nominating Commission, who narrowed the pool of candidates from 12 applicants to three finalists. He said he was surprised and excited to hear that Gov. Deal had chosen him.

“For me to go from municipal court, which is a part-time position that handles traffic offenses and shoplifting and things of that nature, to transfer to the superior court, which is the highest trial level in the state court system, is very exciting,” Massey said.

Because his new position as Superior Court judge will be full-time, Massey will no longer practice at his law firm. He plans to wrap up some of his cases in the days before his swearing in and transfer the rest to his partners at the firm.

Massey lives in Greensboro with his wife Shelly, with whom he has three children. His swearing-in date is not yet scheduled, but he said he looks forward to this new chapter of serving on the Superior Court.

“It’s something I’ve wanted to do for a long time,” Massey said, “and it was a good time in my career to make the transition.”